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Mesodyne’s high-energy-density ultra-quiet portable power generator reduces the battery load of dismounted warfighters by 75% so they can carry 2 extra gallons of water or 20 extra magazines of ammunition. Developed at MIT’s Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies and incubated at Argonne National Lab, the technology converts fuel to electricity in the 1-300 W range.

  • Its small form factor with ultra high energy density of 800-1000 Wh/kg far surpasses even state-of-the-art batteries.

  • Its multifuel operation requires no special fuels and is JP-8 compatible, unlike fuel cells.

  • Its silent and static conversion process has virtually no moving parts, unlike conventional generators which are loud and bulky.

  • Its ready-to-go operation means no downtime, long shelf life, and no sunlight needed.

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Mesodyne’s technology converts fuel into electricity with heat and light as intermediaries.

Specifically, Mesodyne's thermophotovoltaic portable power generator works by burning fuel to heat a photonic crystal thermal emitter to incandescence, leading to infrared radiation which drives specialized photovoltaic cells to generate electricity.

Simply put, Mesodyne delivers watts of electricity at the fuel flow of a lighter in the palm of your hand.

Mesodyne’s high-energy-density ultra-quiet portable power generator reduces the battery load of dismounted warfighters by 75% so they can carry 2 extra gallons of water or 20 extra magazines of ammunition. 

In addition to the dismounted warfighter, Mesodyne’s technology has the potential to provide quiet portable power for homeland security and disaster relief personnel, as well as be used for recreational camping and extreme mountaineering. It can also increase the operational lifetime of clandestine intelligence sensors as well as remote sensors for commercial/industrial applications. Finally, it also has the potential to improve the flight sustainment of fixed wing drones.